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13 Old Hollywood Hot Spots That Defined an Era

13 Old Hollywood Hot Spots That Defined an Era

The Mocambo 1/13The MocamboThe pivotal West Hollywood nightclub, which regularly hosted artists like Dorothy Dandridge and Eartha Kitt, served as the debut spot for two singular performers: Frank Sinatra, who was making his Los Angeles debut as a solo act, and Ella Fitzgerald, who only got a slot thanks to a bit of lobbying from Marilyn Monroe. “She personally called the owner of the Mocambo and told him she wanted me booked immediately, and if he would do it, she would take a front table every night,” Fitzgerald once said. “The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. The press went overboard. After that, I never had to play a small jazz club again.”The Brown Derby 2/13The Brown DerbyClark Gable proposed to Carole Lombard at the Vine St. location of this much-loved restaurant chain. The spot was also home to quite a few scenes in I Love Lucy, most notably the one in which Lucille Ball stares agog at William Holden, who’s just trying to order a Cobb salad (so named after Brown Derby co-owner Robert Cobb) in peace.The Chateau Marmont3/13The Chateau MarmontBuilt in 1929, the gothic hotel nestled away on Sunset Boulevard has always been a bit more on the rock-and-roll side, thanks to its protective, camera-free atmosphere (well, before smartphones, anyway). It’s the sort of place where James Dean could leap out of a window during an audition for Rebel Without a Cause, or where Harry Cohn, then the president of Columbia Pictures, warned rising stars William Holden and Glenn Ford, “If you must get into trouble, do it at the Chateau Marmont.” But sometimes the trouble turns tragic, as in 1982, when comedian John Belushi died of a speedball injection while staying in Bungalow 3.Source: Google News Hollywood

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