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Richard Gill, world-renowned conductor and music educator, dies age 76

Richard Gill, world-renowned conductor and music educator, dies age 76

Music Richard Gill, world-renowned conductor and music educator, dies age 76

Tributes flow for ‘brilliant teacher’ and passionate music advocate who died from cancer in Sydney on Sunday

Richard Gill in 2005.
Richard Gill, pictured here in 2005, died at home in Sydney on Sunday morning. Photograph: Tracey Nearmy/AAP

Internationally renowned conductor and music educator Richard Gill died at his home in Sydney on Sunday, age 76. He had been receiving care for colorectal and peritoneal cancer.

On Saturday, more than 70 musicians gathered outside of his home with their instruments and music stands, and played one of his favourite pieces, The Dam Busters March.

ABC Q&A (@QandA)

Richard Gill on Q&A “Everyone can do it! Don’t give up on music.” https://t.co/Kz6fE5XBLm via @YouTube

October 27, 2018

Gill was passionate about music education, particularly in public schools. He specialised in opera, musical theatre and choral training and appeared on television shows like Spicks and Specks and Q&A to bring these styles to wider audiences.

He was the founder and first artistic director of Victorian Opera, and created the National Music Teacher Mentoring Program, a scheme funded by the government and designed to increase access to quality music education for all Australian primary school students. He was also director of the Sydney Chamber Choir, head of the Australian Romantic & Classical Orchestra, and was associated with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, the Auckland Philharmonia Orches tra, and the Australian National Academy of Music.

Leigh Sales (@leighsales)

Australia has lost a truly magnificent human being this morning. You'd be hard pressed to name anybody who has done more for public music education in this country. A brilliant teacher, delightful person, force of nature, absolute legend. Vale. https://t.co/T4LUGLoYdr

October 27, 2018

In 1994 Gill received an Order of Australia Medal, and in August he was awarded the Arts Leadership Award at a ceremony held by Creative Partnerships Australia at the Art Gallery of NSW. His final public performance was in July, when he led the Sydney Flash Mob Choir through The Beatles’ When I’m Sixty-Four at the City Recital Hall in Sydney.

Anne Knock (@AnneKnock)

Vale Richard Gill.
Sad to read the loss of this great man. @DWS_80 & I met him for coffee in the lead up to the @LE_Aust conference in May. We were inspired by his passion for music education & reaching out to kids on the edges, inspiring a love of music. https://t.co/yO02IAc9TN

October 27, 2018

In a tribute posted to Facebook, the Australian Romantic & Classical Orchestra wrote that Gill “spent a life systematically addressing the widespread shortcomings and neglect of music in Australia’s education system”.

“He was convinced of the positive effects of music on young people,” the post said.

“Like the fading of a beautiful sustained note, or that magical silence following a fabulous performance, a loss as significant as Richard Gill cannot be adequately explained or understood.”

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Source: Google News Music

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